UPDATE ON THE USE OF PESTICIDES, CHLORPYRIFOS AND CHLORPYRIFOS-METHYL

http://info.coleacp.org/trk/87912/5216/300150402/20352/1701/b9864722/>

*IMPORTANT INFORMATION REGARDING USE OF CHLORPYRIFOS AND
CHLORPYRIFOS-METHYL*

*This flash info provides updates on regulatory changes regarding active
substances approval and associated MRL changes in the European Union and
urgent actions to be taken.*

Chlorpyrifos and chlorpyrifos-methyl are broad spectrum organophosphorus
insecticides and acaricides used to control soil and foliage pests.
Examples of pests controlled and applications are provided bellow.

*Chlorpyrifos* *Chlorpyrifos-methyl*
*Example of application* Fruit including apples, pears, grapes, pineapples,
bananas, strawberries, mango; Tomatoes; Vegetables including carrots,
cabbages, cauliflower, Brussel sprouts Fruit including apples, pears,
grapes, pineapples, bananas, strawberries, mango; Tomatoes; Vegetables
including carrots, cabbages, cauliflower

*Non-renewal of the approval of chlorpyrifos and chlorpyrifos-methyl in the
European Union*

On December 6 2019, the European Commission decided not to renew the
authorization of both active substances chlorpyrifos and
chlorpyrifos-methyl.
Links to Commission Implementing Regulations concerning the *non-renewal*
of the approval of the active substances are provided bellow.

In the EU, Member States will withdraw authorizations for plant protection
products containing chlorpyrifos by 16 February 2020. Disposal, storage,
placing on the market and use of existing stocks within the EU will be
banned by 16 April 2020.

*Change of Maximum Residue Limits (MRLs)*

Following non-renewal of EU authorizations, a vote on the MRL change will
take place on 17-18 February 2020. *MRLs for chlorpyrifos and
chlorpyrifos-methyl will be lowered to the limit of determination: 0.01
mg/kg*.

The exact date of entry into force is not confirmed yet but the MRL change
is expected to enter into force in September-October 2020. COLEACP will
inform you as soon as possible.

Considering the wide range of applications, *users of these two active
substances are advised to start looking for alternatives as soon as
possible*. Should you encounter any specific issues regarding this matter,
please contact COLEACP at: network@coleacp.org.
*For more details*

– COMMISSION IMPLEMENTING REGULATION (EU) 2020/18 of 10 January 2020
concerning the non-renewal of the approval of the active substance
chlorpyrifos
<http://info.coleacp.org/trk/87914/5216/300150402/20352/1701/b9864722/>

– COMMISSION IMPLEMENTING REGULATION (EU) 2020/17 of 10 January 2020
concerning the non-renewal of the approval of the active substance
chlorpyrifos-methyl
<http://info.coleacp.org/trk/87915/5216/300150402/20352/1701/b9864722/>

– Draft Regulation amending Annexes II and V to Regulation (EC) No
396/2005 of the European Parliament and of the Council as regards maximum
residue levels for chlorpyrifos and chlorpyrifos-methyl in or on certain
products
<http://info.coleacp.org/trk/87916/5216/300150402/20352/1701/b9864722/>

– Annex of the Draft Regulation
<http://info.coleacp.org/trk/87917/5216/300150402/20352/1701/b9864722/>
Subject:* IMPORTANT – USE OF CHLORPYRIFOS AND CHLORPYRIFOS-METHYL

<http://info.coleacp.org/trk/87912/5216/300150402/20352/1701/b9864722/>

.

*IMPORTANT INFORMATION REGARDING USE OF CHLORPYRIFOS AND
CHLORPYRIFOS-METHYL*

*This flash info provides updates on regulatory changes regarding active
substances approval and associated MRL changes in the European Union and
urgent actions to be taken.*

Chlorpyrifos and chlorpyrifos-methyl are broad spectrum organophosphorus
insecticides and acaricides used to control soil and foliage pests.
Examples of pests controlled and applications are provided bellow.

*Chlorpyrifos* *Chlorpyrifos-methyl*
*Example of application* Fruit including apples, pears, grapes, pineapples,
bananas, strawberries, mango; Tomatoes; Vegetables including carrots,
cabbages, cauliflower, Brussel sprouts Fruit including apples, pears,
grapes, pineapples, bananas, strawberries, mango; Tomatoes; Vegetables
including carrots, cabbages, cauliflower

*Non-renewal of the approval of chlorpyrifos and chlorpyrifos-methyl in the
European Union*

On December 6 2019, the European Commission decided not to renew the
authorization of both active substances chlorpyrifos and
chlorpyrifos-methyl.
Links to Commission Implementing Regulations concerning the *non-renewal*
of the approval of the active substances are provided bellow.

In the EU, Member States will withdraw authorizations for plant protection
products containing chlorpyrifos by 16 February 2020. Disposal, storage,
placing on the market and use of existing stocks within the EU will be
banned by 16 April 2020.

*Change of Maximum Residue Limits (MRLs)*

Following non-renewal of EU authorizations, a vote on the MRL change will
take place on 17-18 February 2020. *MRLs for chlorpyrifos and
chlorpyrifos-methyl will be lowered to the limit of determination: 0.01
mg/kg*.

The exact date of entry into force is not confirmed yet but the MRL change
is expected to enter into force in September-October 2020. COLEACP will
inform you as soon as possible.

Considering the wide range of applications, *users of these two active
substances are advised to start looking for alternatives as soon as
possible*. Should you encounter any specific issues regarding this matter,
please contact COLEACP at: network@coleacp.org.

*For more details*

– COMMISSION IMPLEMENTING REGULATION (EU) 2020/18 of 10 January 2020
concerning the non-renewal of the approval of the active substance
chlorpyrifos
<http://info.coleacp.org/trk/87914/5216/300150402/20352/1701/b9864722/>

– COMMISSION IMPLEMENTING REGULATION (EU) 2020/17 of 10 January 2020
concerning the non-renewal of the approval of the active substance
chlorpyrifos-methyl
<http://info.coleacp.org/trk/87915/5216/300150402/20352/1701/b9864722/>

– Draft Regulation amending Annexes II and V to Regulation (EC) No
396/2005 of the European Parliament and of the Council as regards maximum
residue levels for chlorpyrifos and chlorpyrifos-methyl in or on certain
products
<http://info.coleacp.org/trk/87916/5216/300150402/20352/1701/b9864722/>

– Annex of the Draft Regulation
<http://info.coleacp.org/trk/87917/5216/300150402/20352/1701/b9864722/>
Date uploaded=25 January, 2020

POVERTY, LIVER CANCER  AND AFLATOXINS IN AFRICA

 

As at November, 2019 the NCRI cancer conference reported a triple- fold increase in deaths arising from liver cancer in England than ever before. The survey covered a 20-year period between 1997 and 2016 confirmed that this was common among the most deprived of the society. As a matter of fact, there has been a 80% rise in liver cancer deaths in the UK In April, 2019. The American Cancer Society noted that liver cancer is the fastest growing cause of cancer deaths in the USA and the targets are the adult men with less education. The data for Africa are not yet ready!!. Although obesity and excessive alcohol intake were the candidate risk factors, little attention has been placed on the consumption of unwholesome food items particularly laden with aflatoxins. Most of the vulnerable were the uneducated and economically challenged, who are forced by circumstance, not choice, to take any food item, whatever may be the hygienic state.

The Liver Foundation, an American NGO has set aside October as Liver cancer awareness month in recognition of the scare and threat of the deadly morbidity. It is recalled that Oct 17 is marked every year to bring attention to the need to eradicate all forms of extreme poverty, including malnutrition. The Africa Union recognizes the consumption of aflatoxin- dense food as a form of malnutrition, which in itself, is an emblem of poverty. Since it is established that, across the world, liver cancer deaths are traceable to, hepatitis B and C as well as alcohol and aflatoxin consumption, poverty and lack of education are being scandalously left out and have to be addressed. Most post -harvest food items, like maize, ground nut, guinea corn, millet, soybean and rice in Africa are targets of moulds which produce aflatoxins that cannot be detected by ordinary eyes and devoid of odour or taste. These toxins are a group of compounds, secreted on food items in store, transit or on farms. One of the members is the aflatoxin B1, a compound recognised by the International Agency for Research on Cancer, IARC, an arm of the WHO, to have the ability to incite cancer, thus locating it as Group 1 carcinogen. Set up in 1965, the IARC coordinates and conducts both epidemiological and laboratory research into the causes of human cancer . Aflatoxin is the only product of living source that has such attribute.

Detection of aflatoxin in food is expensive, making it easily, innocently accessed and the spread uncontrollable. In the UK alone, about 6000 people are diagnosed with liver cancer each year. In the USA, about 42,000 people are expected to be told the have liver cancer this year 2019. What is the profile for Africa??  In an economically challenged Africa, where it is difficult to convince people to throw away unwholesome food items, particularly where other options are either expensive or not available, it is certain that aflatoxin consumption will contribute to the incidence of liver cancer. Intervention measures by Africa include PACA, the Partnership for Aflatoxin Control in Africa, with external funding. The PACA has been operating in selected countries and it is hoped that the extension department of the scheme will be rejigged to achieve a measure of hope for the continent. When farmers and exporters are not aware or equipped with the basics of food safety, only contaminated crops will result, leading to health compromise and export rejects or even trade bans. In Africa, data on risk assessment are sparse and uncoordinated, with little interdisciplinary collaboration, Yet, and most unfortunately, most of the materials rejected at the point of entry as exports to Europe, are consumed locally here ion Africa.

Food safety activities and departments should be decentralized for small holder farmers and operators to have a better feel of the impact. Commodity associations should be streamlined to emphasize compliance with standards before release to the market. Also awareness campaigns should be intensified consciously by research institutes, regulatory agencies, the Press and NGOs. Since the UN promotes fair global trade, the World Trade Organization also has a role to play. Research should now, focus on the manufacture of farmer-friendly hand-held tools or sensors that can easily detect, whether qualitatively or semi quantitatively, contaminants in food, on site. At present, detection techniques are fairly time consuming, expensive and highly technical

Prevention remains the most effective intervention approach and biological input is an attraction.

 

 

Dele Fapohunda

08033709492(sms only)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

POST HARVEST EXHIBITION, ADDIS ABABA 2019

 

  • 2nd All African Postharvest Congress and Exhibition, 17-20 September 2019, Addis Ababa
  •  

    2nd AAPHCE(Self-Sponsored)
    Postharvest Loss Reduction and Agro-processing: Drivers of Agricultural Transformation in Africa
    September 17 – 20 2019 · African Union Commission

    BACKGROUND AND RATIONALE

    Africa has remained the most food insecure continent in the world, with approximately one in four people undernourished. Over the years, most African governments have focused on increasing production to meet the food and nutrition needs of the ever rising population which is estimated to reach 2.5 billion by the year 2050. Indeed, most of the strategies for food and nutrition security (FNS) have been focused more on extensification (putting more land to production) and intensification (increased use of agro-inputs). However, these approaches to FNS are challenged by the limited and inelastic production resources (including land, water, energy, agro-inputs). Current food production systems are unsustainable and climate change poses additional challenge to sustainable agriculture in Africa.

    Historical over-emphasis on increased agricultural production without complementary interventions to ensure proper utilization of the food produced has contributed to the reported increase in postharvest food loss and waste over the years. Global food losses and waste is estimated at 1.3 billion metric tonnes (MT), equivalent to over 30% of the total food produced for human consumption, and it is estimated that global food wastage could feed up to 1.6 billion people annually. In sub-Saharan Africa alone, the total quantitative food loss has been estimated to be over 100 million MT/year. For grains alone, the value of postharvest losses is equivalent to approximately USD 4 billion/year (at 2007 prices), which could meet the annual food requirements of about 48 million people. The value of food loss exceeds the annual value of grain imports into Africa. These losses exacerbate food insecurity and have negative impacts on the environment through wasting precious land, water, farm inputs and energy used in producing food that is not consumed. In addition, postharvest losses reduce income to farmers and contribute to higher food prices.

    AGENDA

    Tuesday, September 17
      • Pre-conference

        Excursions – Pre-Conference Meetings – Side Events – Partners Meetings

        8:00 AM – 2:00 PM

      • Event Start

        2:00 PM

      • Official opening

        Opening Remarks: H. E Amb. Josefa Sacko, Commissioner for Rural Economy and Agriculture, African Union Commission, (AUC)

        2:30 PM – 6:00 PM

    Wednesday, September 18
      • Plenary presentations on subtheme 1
        (Public sector initiatives in
        postharvest loss reduction and
        agro-processing: policy,
        strategies and regulations
        ).

        Rwanda – Netherlands

        9:00 AM – 10:00 AM

      • Panel discussion and interactive session.

        10:30 AM – 1:00 PM

      • Plenary presentations on Sub-theme 2: Financing models/options for agro-processing and postharvest managment .

        Damian Ihedioha (AfDB) – Rockefeller Foundation
        (Betty Kibaara)

        2:00 PM – 3:00 PM

      • Panel discussions and interactive session.

        3:30 PM – 5:00 PM

    Thursday, September 19
      • Plenary presenation on Sub-theme 3: Science ,technology and innovation in postharvest managment and agro processing.

        Lead Speakers : Umezuruike Linus Opara, Bart Nicolai

        9:00 AM – 10:00 AM

      • Panel discussions and interactive session.

        10:30 AM – 1:00 PM

      • Plenary presentations on Sub- theme 4: Capacity development and outreach programs in postharvest managment and agro-processing.

        Lead Speakers : Lisa Kitinoja
        (Postharvest Education
        Foundation)
        , Wageningen University
        and Research

        2:00 PM – 3:00 PM

      • Panel discussions and interactive session.

        3:30 PM – 5:00 PM

    Friday, September 20
      • Plenary presentation on Sub-theme 5: Youth and women empowerment through postharvest managment and agro-processing.

        Lead Speakers : AAIN (Alex Ariho)
        , Jemimah Njuki (IDRC)

        9:00 AM – 10:00 AM

      • Plenary presentations on Sub- theme 6: Private sector initiatives and public-private-partnerships (PPP) in postharvest managment and agro processing.

        Lead Speakers : Brett Rierson (WFP)
        ,Gerald Masila (EAGC

        11:00 AM – 1:00 PM

      • Reading of the communique.

        2:00 PM – 5:00 PM

      • Event End

        5:00 PM

      • Closing Ceremony.

        Award ceremony for Malabo
        PHL goal (Based on BR)
        , Closing remarks from the
        Commissioner/CP
        , Closing remarks from the
        Prime Minister Federal
        Democratic Republic of
        Ethiopia

        5:00 PM – 6:30 PM

 

EU REVIEWS BEAN BAN ON NIGERIA

The review of the trade  ban placed on Nigeria by the European Union over excess levels of pesticide contaminant is on going in Abuja today 16 May 2019 . It will be recalled that the ban slammed on Nigeria because the dried beans contained dichlorvos at levels over and above acceptable limits

 

The critical meeting is assessing whether to let the ban expire or whether to extend it for another period.The federal Ministry of Agriculture and Nigeria Agric Quarantine Service are taking part in the review

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dele Fapohunda

May 16, 2019

CALL FOR AN END TO FOOD FRAUD IN NIGERIA

A call has gone to all stakeholders to work harder to discourage all forms of food fraud in Nigeria. The call was made by a mycotoxicologist, Prof Stephen Fapohunda. Fapohunda, who is the Founding President of Mycotoxicology Society of Nigeria and a Trustee of same believes that farmers and exporters can be encouraged through affordable, site friendly  testing devices  whose results are acceptable globally.

He stated that food producers and exporters  most sub saharan  African countries need to partner with colleagues in developed countries and arrive at reliable intervetion strategies. Most of the stakeholders have the challenge of awareness and poverty, he stated

 

 

For more, please visit

FOOD SAFETY AND TRADE CONFERENCE HOLDS IN APRIL 2019

The Future of food safety in the world will be discussed on April  2019  at a conference to be held  in Geneva on 23-24 April 2019. It is to be organized  by FAO, WHO and WTO. At the Symposioum all issues regarding capacities of developing countries, responses to infringements and need for compliance will be discussed

 

For more , please visit

https://www.who.int/food-safety/international-food-safety-conference/

food-quality@fao.org

foodsafety@who.int

EQUIPMENT CONTAMINANTS IN FOOD AND ENVIRONMENT ??

We distribute and serve as AGENTS for equipment and materials for the detection of contaminants in FOOD and the ENVIRONMENT  eg soil, water

Mycotoxins, pesticides, veterinary drugs, heavy metals etc are candidate analytes.

 

Relevant Manufacturers and / Distributors are advised to contact

rhizucor@gmail.com

234 8033709492

PARTNERSHIP OPPORTUNITIES NOW OPEN-2019

Partnership opportunities are now open to manfacturers of BIOPRODUCTS looking for a reliable outlet in Africa, particularly Nigeria. Nigeria is well known as a large market

The products must have green and safe impact on Agriculture and Environment

 

Please contact

rhizucor@gmail.com

or  call  234 8033709492

WELCOME TO A PARTNERSHIP THAT IS PRODUCTIVE AND LASTING

You re welcome to Rhizucor Nig Ltd, a company that enjoys passion in AGRICULTURE and ENVIRONMENT

Based in Nigeria, this company strives to engage genuine institutions in long term relationships that market their products and services. We procure raw materials for industries and accept manufactured products for effective distribution and utilization

 

Visit our website for more opportunities

www.rhizucor.com

@rhizucor

rhizucor@gmail.com